epigram

What is epigram?

epigram meaning in Information Science terminology / glossary / dictionary is:

In the classical period, an inscription or epitaph, but in modern usage a tersely witty, often antithetical saying, ingeniously composed in prose or verse, delivered with aplomb to make a point in a manner calculated to enhance one’s reputation in the company of people who value feats of intellectual and literary virtuosity. The satirical form, established in ancient Rome by Martial (see this 15th-century manuscript copy), was cultivated in England from the late 16th to the early 20th century. An example by Hilaire Belloc:

ON OLD LADY POLTAGRUE, A PUBLIC PERIL
The Devil, having nothing else to do,
Went off to tempt my Lady Poltagrue.
My Lady, tempted by a private whim,
To his extreme annoyance, tempted him.

The Victorian author and playwright Oscar Wilde has been dubbed “The Emperor of Epigrams.” Examples of his work can be found in The Penguin Dictionary of Epigrams (2002) edited by M.J. Cohen.

 

reference: ABC-CLIO

Tags: